Lifestyle Session Share: Twin Boys!

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Lifestyle Session Share: Twin Boys!













Inspiration – I shoot documentary/lifestyle sessions, so unless my clients specify beforehand that they want something a bit stylized, I tend to go into the session knowing a bit about their personalities and desires for the shoot. This was my first same-sex parent family, and they had (fraternal) twin one year old boys, and live in a city apartment, and it was winter mid-afternoon, so I was a little nervous heading in to the shoot! Before the shoot the moms mentioned that they wanted to capture the “chaos in all its glory”, so I think that was definitely one inspiration that I focused on, especially in the apartment.
Favorite Element – The cool tones of winter paired with vulnerable, chubby, curious, and red nosed faces. I am also in love with the shot of the family crossing the street. The composition along with the family still being connected even though not on the same side – it just works for me.
Biggest Challenge – Some of the same things that make the shoot work! The cramped apartment plus it being winter in the city with no snow on the ground don’t exactly add up to pretty photos. That plus the unfocused energy of two one-year olds… Let’s just say I knew going into this shoot that it would be challenging (plus it was my first shoot back at it after a maternity leave so I wasn’t on much sleep myself!). I just chose to delve in and do my best to capture things as they were, let the boys be themselves and enjoy playing with their moms and exploring the park across the street from their apartment.
Final Thoughts – I left the shoot feeling crazed, and worried that there wouldn’t be any good images. I probably showed a little fear on my face when I arrived to the apartment and saw the condition it was in too! But I shot A LOT of photos. One of my goals is generally to snap the shutter less, but when you are working with little ones who are all over the place sometimes it is better to play it safe and to deal with a longer culling process later. Most of the shots weren’t great, but the final edit felt like each photo worked individually and together as part of a narrative.

Elizabeth C. Libert
elizabethclarkphoto@gmail.com
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